What’s the Healthiest Pasta?

What's the Healthiest Pasta?Pasta has gotten a bit of a bad rap. Most people would agree that if you’re looking to lose weight or simply to maintain your weight loss, it’s best to cut out pasta completely. This isn’t necessarily true, though. As is the case with everything, moderation is key. Don’t eat it for dinner each night, and when you do, keep your serving size to a minimum. People tend to eat A LOT of pasta–certainly more than the single-serving that’s suggested on the side of the pasta box.

Along with limiting the quanity of pasta you consume, consider experimenting with other types of pasta as well. No, I don’t mean switching up your rotini for fusilli or your linguine for fettuccine. Traditional pasta that we all know and love is made with refined white durum flour. Think of this type of pasta as the white bread of the pasta world. We all know if you’re watching your waistline, you should avoid white bread and other refined starches. Fortunately there are many other options.

Switching from “normal” pasta to whole wheat pasta is definitely a healthier option, but it’s definitely an acquired taste. The texture just isn’t the same, but if you’re looking for a pasta fix, this is a suitable replacement. Just make sure that ¬†you keep the creamy sauces to a minimum, opting for a thick and chunky tomato-based sauce that will fill you up more than a thinner creamy sauce. An added bonus: whole wheat pasta has a lot more fiber than traditional pasta, which can also help you to feel more full.

Those on a gluten-free kick will likely be aware of the ever-growing availability of corn and rice-based pastas lining store shelves. These will likely seem like the healthiest option, but a quick comparison between nutrition labels will reveal that these gluten-free pastas tend to have more carbs and less fiber than the gluten-based pastas. So, unless you’re choosing gluten-free out of genuine health concerns, there’s likely a better option.

So what’s the best compromise if you want the taste and texture of traditional pasta but with the benefits of whole wheat pasta? Check out multigrain pastas at your local grocery store. They’re the best of both worlds, providing you with the increased fiber from whole wheat pasta with the familiar taste and texture from regular pasta.

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Onnit DigesTech Released!

Onnit DigesTech ReleasedIt’s been a busy week for Onnit, with the release of its Zombie Bells kettle bells, new posters, a new shirt, and now its digestion aid. Like they say, when it rains, it pours. I’m excited about the Zombie Bells as much as the next guy, but don’t overlook Onnit’s newest supplement DigesTech.

From its name alone you can likely gather that DigesTech aids in digestion. Fortunately this is not a problem that I have to deal with, but I know that many of you do. That being said, DigesTech isn’t solely for the people who have trouble digesting things like dairy, fats, carbs, protein, and fiber.

Of course, those who do have digestion issues will feel positive effects from taking DigesTech. This product contains professional grade digestion enzymes that are formulated to help break down everything I mentioned above. This can ease discomfort that comes from digesting food, but Onnit’s DigesTech helps you absorb nutrients more efficiently as well.

Onnit DigesTech is crafted using a variety of ingredients designed to break down the five major food categories I mentioned above. These ingredients include protease to digest protein, amylase to digest carbs, lipase to digest fat, along with 14 other digestive aids. This is the time of year when people tend to overeat and eat especially large meals, so DigesTech is the perfect all-natural solution to help you feel a little bit better. You will absorb more nutrients and your body will break down the food faster, leading to a decrease in fatigue and bloating after big holiday meals.

Health Myths and Misconceptions Debunked

Health Myths and Misconceptions DebunkedThere are a lot of myths and conspiracies in the world, from UFOs to 9/11 and ghosts as well, and there are a wide range of shows devoted to these topics. But myths can apply to your health, too. These are in the forms of myths like eating fatty foods can make you fat, foods with carbs can make you fat, and things along those lines. But which ones are fact and which are fiction?

I read many blogs, with one of my favorites being Lifehacker. Recently Lifehacker posted an article (linked below) which outlines a number of these myths and misconceptions. For instance, fatty foods don’t necessarily make you fat. In reality, our bodies need fat, the key is which fats you eat, and in what quantities. The right fats can also help you to feel full, and as a result, aid in weight loss.

Years ago the Adkins craze was in full swing, with tens of thousands of people cutting carbs out of their diets completely. Once again, moderation proves to be key rather than completely eliminating something from your diet. In the case of carbs, much like fats, the type of carbs you eat is what’s important.

Check out the full article for more details about food myths, including the ones mentioned above, along with others related to MSG, gluten, and high-fructose corn syrup. What the article finds is that some of these things may not be bad for you at all. There are also some myths related to exercise–such as exercises that purport to burn fat in specific areas–that I think readers of this blog, and those who are looking to lose weight and get healthier could really benefit from.

Via: Lifehacker